Real-space imaging of nanoplasmonic resonances
Journal article, 2010

Resonant nanoplasmonic structures have long been recognized for their unique applications in subwavelength control of light for enhanced transmission, focussing, field confinement, decay rate management, etc. Increasingly, they are also integrated in electro-optical analytical sensors, shrinking the active volume while at the same time improving sensitivity and specificity. The microscopic imaging of resonances in such structures and also their dynamic variations has seen dramatic advances in recent years. In this Minireview we outline the current status of this rapidly evolving field, discussing both optical and electron microscopy approaches, the limiting issues in spatial resolution and data interpretation, the quantities that can be recorded, as well as the growing importance of time-resolving methods.

Modes

Near-field measurements

Photoemission electron-microscopy

Femtosecond microscopy

Gold nanoparticles

Surface-plasmon resonances

Scanning optical microscopy

Magnetic field

Energy-losses

Diameter metallic apertures

Author

R. Vogelgesang

Max Planck Institute

Alexander Dmitriev

Chalmers, Applied Physics, Bionanophotonics

The Analyst

0003-2654 (ISSN) 1364-5528 (eISSN)

Vol. 135 6 1175-1181

Subject Categories

Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics

DOI

10.1039/c000887g

More information

Latest update

2/21/2018