State-of-practice in GUI-based system and acceptance testing: An industrial multiple-case study
Paper in proceedings, 2013

Software testing is an essential means of evaluating software quality. System and acceptance tests aim to validate a system's conformance to its requirements on a high level of system abstraction. Therefore, they are generally performed by executing end-user scenarios through the system's graphical user interface (GUI). However, to the authors' best knowledge, there are no empirical studies that evaluate how GUI-based system and acceptance testing is performed in industrial practice. In this paper, we present a multiple-case study with the goal to investigate the state-of-practice of GUI-based system and acceptance testing at six software development companies of varying context. The main findings are that manual, GUI-based system testing is widespread and that automated GUI-based system and acceptance testing exists only on a small scale. Additionally, the study identifies core problems with GUI-based system and acceptance testing such as test tool limitations, high test costs and customer involvement in testing.

Acceptance Testing

GUI-based Testing

System Testing

Empirical Study

Case Study

Quality assurance

Process improvement

Software Testing

Author

Grischa Liebel

Chalmers, Computer Science and Engineering (Chalmers), Software Engineering (Chalmers)

Emil Alégroth

Chalmers, Computer Science and Engineering (Chalmers), Software Engineering (Chalmers)

Robert Feldt

Chalmers, Computer Science and Engineering (Chalmers), Software Engineering (Chalmers)

Proceedings - 39th Euromicro Conference Series on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, SEAA 2013. Santander; Spain; 4 September 2013 through 6 September 2013

17-24

Subject Categories

Computer and Information Science

DOI

10.1109/SEAA.2013.29

ISBN

978-076955091-6

More information

Created

10/7/2017