Engineering and detecting microwave photons
Licentiate thesis, 2015

Microwave quantum optics using superconducting circuits, also known as circuit QED, is a recent and promising field to study light-matter interactions at the fundamental level. In this field, artificial atoms made of superconducting elements interact with microwave photons routed through one dimensional transmission lines. This thesis is under the purview of circuit QED and is based on the three appended papers. In these three articles, we look at the problems of engineering photon-photon interaction (a la cross-Kerr effect) in microwaves using an artificial atom, storing and retrieving microwave photons using a tunable cavity and finally detecting a single propagating microwave photon non-destructively. The analysis is done using the framework of open quantum systems, where we use master equations and stochastic master equations to study the evolution of these artificial atoms in the presence of environment and under measurements respectively.

microwave photon detection

Quantum optics

open quantum systems.

tunable cavity

cross-Kerr effect

circuit QED

hbar (Room C511), MC2, 5th floor, Kemivagen 9, Goteborg
Opponent: Prof. Andreas Isacsson, Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

Author

Sankar Raman Sathyamoorthy

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Applied Quantum Physics

Storage and on-demand release of microwaves using superconducting resonators with tunable coupling

Applied Physics Letters,; Vol. 104(2014)p. Art. Nr. 232604-

Journal article

Quantum Nondemolition Detection of a Propagating Microwave Photon

Physical Review Letters,; Vol. 112(2014)p. art. no. 093601-

Journal article

Giant Cross–Kerr Effect for Propagating Microwaves Induced by an Artificial Atom

Physical Review Letters,; Vol. 111(2013)p. article nr. 053601-

Journal article

Areas of Advance

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (2010-2017)

Subject Categories

Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics

Technical report MC2 - Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology: 1652-0769

hbar (Room C511), MC2, 5th floor, Kemivagen 9, Goteborg

Opponent: Prof. Andreas Isacsson, Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

More information

Created

10/7/2017