Wine yeast peroxiredoxin tsa1 plays a role in growth, stress response and trehalose metabolism in biomass propagation
Journal article, 2020

Peroxiredoxins are a family of peroxide-degrading enzymes for challenging oxidative stress. They receive their reducing power from redox-controlling proteins called thioredoxins, and these, in turn, from thioredoxin reductase. The main cytosolic peroxiredoxin is Tsa1, a moonlighting protein that also acts as protein chaperone a redox switch controlling some metabolic events. Gene deletion of peroxiredoxins in wine yeasts indicate that TSA1, thioredoxins and thioredoxin reductase TRR1 are required for normal growth in medium with glucose and sucrose as carbon sources. TSA1 gene deletion also diminishes growth in molasses, both in flasks and bioreactors. The TSA1 mutation brings about an expected change in redox parameters but, interestingly, it also triggers a variety of metabolic changes. It influences trehalose accumulation, lowering it in first molasses growth stages, but increasing it at the end of batch growth, when respiratory metabolism is set up. Glycogen accumulation at the entry of the stationary phase also increases in the tsa1∆ mutant. The mutation reduces fermentative capacity in grape juice, but the vinification profile does not significantly change. However, acetic acid and acetaldehyde production decrease when TSA1 is absent. Hence, TSA1 plays a role in the regulation of metabolic reactions leading to the production of such relevant enological molecules.

Biomass

Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Peroxiredoxins

Tsa1

Oxidative stress

Wine

Author

Víctor Garrigós

Universitat de Valencia

Cecilia Picazo Campos

Universitat de Valencia

Chalmers, Biology and Biological Engineering, Systems and Synthetic Biology

Emilia Matallana

Universitat de Valencia

Agustín Aranda

Universitat de Valencia

Microorganisms

20762607 (eISSN)

Vol. 8 10 1-18 1537

Subject Categories

Cell Biology

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)

DOI

10.3390/microorganisms8101537

PubMed

33036195

More information

Latest update

8/23/2021