Sorption and Release of Organics by Primary, Anaerobic, and Aerobic Activated Sludge Mixed with Raw Municipal Wastewater
Journal article, 2015

New activated sludge processes that utilize sorption as a major mechanism for organics removal are being developed to maximize energy recovery from wastewater organics, or as enhanced primary treatment technologies. To model and optimize sorption-based activated sludge processes, further knowledge about sorption of organics onto sludge is needed. This study compared primary-, anaerobic-, and aerobic activated sludge as sorbents, determined sorption capacity and kinetics, and investigated some characteristics of the organics being sorbed. Batch sorption assays were carried out without aeration at a mixing velocity of 200 rpm. Only aerobic activated sludge showed net sorption of organics. Sorption of dissolved organics occurred by a near-instantaneous sorption event followed by a slower process that obeyed 1st order kinetics. Sorption of particulates also followed 1st order kinetics but there was no instantaneous sorption event; instead there was a release of particles upon mixing. The 5-min sorption capacity of activated sludge was 6.5±10.8 mg total organic carbon (TOC) per g volatile suspend solids (VSS) for particulate organics and 5.0±4.7 mgTOC/gVSS for dissolved organics. The observed instantaneous sorption appeared to be mainly due to organics larger than 20 kDa in size being sorbed, although molecules with a size of about 200 Da with strong UV absorbance at 215–230 nm were also rapidly removed.

Author

Oskar Modin

Chalmers, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Water Environment Technology

Soroush Saheb Alam

Chalmers, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Water Environment Technology

Frank Persson

Chalmers, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Water Environment Technology

Britt-Marie Wilen

Chalmers, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Water Environment Technology

PLoS ONE

1932-6203 (ISSN)

Vol. 10 3 e0119371- e0119371

Areas of Advance

Building Futures (2010-2018)

Energy

Life Science Engineering (2010-2018)

Subject Categories

Environmental Engineering

Water Engineering

Bioprocess Technology

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0119371

More information

Created

10/8/2017