Effects of simplifying train bogies on surrounding flow and aerodynamic forces
Journal article, 2019

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd In this study, the numerical solution of a high-speed train with several simplified bogies is investigated. The time-averaged flow field around the train, the surface pressure, and the aerodynamic forces on the train are discussed. The results reveal that a simpler bogie structure can achieve a higher underbody flow velocity and change fluctuations beneath the train owing to the resulting turbulence level. The simplification of bogies has a smaller effect on the side slipstream velocity and pressure compare to which in underbody, and at 3 m away from the centre of the track, the simplified bogie with wheels and a simple side frame used in this study obtains similar results to cases wherein more complex bogies are used. The surface pressure under the train is affected by bogie simplification, especially in the bogie cabin end area, resulting in aerodynamic drag and lift variations. If underbody flow or aerodynamic drag and lift forces are the focus of study, then the geometry of the centre region of the bogie, i.e. its main structures features, should be maintained in simplified models.

Underbody flow

Train

Aerodynamics

IDDES

Bogie

Simplification

Author

Tianyun Dong

National & Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Safety Technology for Rail Vehicle

Central South University

Xifeng Liang

Central South University

National & Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Safety Technology for Rail Vehicle

Sinisa Krajnovic

Chalmers, Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Fluid Dynamics

Xiaohui Xiong

Central South University

National & Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Safety Technology for Rail Vehicle

Wei Zhou

National & Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Safety Technology for Rail Vehicle

Central South University

Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics

0167-6105 (ISSN)

Vol. 191 170-182

Subject Categories

Applied Mechanics

Vehicle Engineering

Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics

DOI

10.1016/j.jweia.2019.06.006

More information

Latest update

7/8/2019 2