Measurements of Emissions to Air from a Marine Engine Fueled by Methanol
Journal article, 2021

Emissions of exhaust gases and particulate matter from a dual fuel marine engine using methanol as fuel with marine gasoil as pilot fuel have been examined for a ferry during operation. The emission factor for nitrogen oxides is lower than what is typically found for marine gasoil but does not reach the tier III limit. The emissions of particulate matter are significantly lower than for fuel oils and similar to what is found for LNG engines. The main part of the particles can be found in the ultrafine range with the peak being at around 18 nm. About 93% of the particles are evaporated and absorbed when using a thermodenuder, and thus a large majority of the particles are volatile. Methanol is a potential future marine fuel that will reduce emissions of air pollutants and can be made as a biofuel to meet emission targets for greenhouse gases.

Methanol

Marine engine

Marine fuels

Shipping

Emissions

Particulate matter

Nitrogen oxides

Author

Erik Fridell

IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

Chalmers, Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Maritime Studies, Maritime Environmental Sciences

Håkan Salberg

IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

Kent Salo

Chalmers, Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Maritime Studies, Maritime Environmental Sciences

Journal of Marine Science and Application

1671-9433 (ISSN) 1993-5048 (eISSN)

Vol. 20 1 38-143

Subject Categories

Bioenergy

Energy Systems

Marine Engineering

DOI

10.1007/s11804-020-00150-6

More information

Latest update

7/21/2021