A single early postnatal estradiol injection affects morphology and gene expression of the ovary and parametrial adipose tissue in adult female rats.
Artikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift, 2010

Events during early life can affect reproductive and metabolic functions in adulthood. We evaluated the programming effects of a single early postnatal estradiol injection (within 3h after birth) in female rats. We assessed ovarian and parametrial adipose tissue morphology, evaluated gene expression related to follicular development and adipose tissue metabolism, and developed a non-invasive volumetric estimation of parametrial adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging. Estradiol reduced ovarian weight, increased antral follicle size and number of atretic antral follicles, and decreased theca interna thickness in atretic antral follicles. Adult estradiol-injected rats also had malformed vaginal openings and lacked corpora lutea, confirming anovulation. Estradiol markedly reduced parametrial adipose tissue mass. Adipocyte size was unchanged, suggesting reduced adipocyte number. Parametrial adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity was increased. In ovaries, estradiol increased mRNA expression of adiponectin, complement component 3, estrogen receptor alpha, and glucose transporter 3 and 4; in parametrial adipose tissue, expression of complement component 3 was increased, expression of estrogen receptor alpha was decreased, and expression of leptin, lipoprotein lipase, and hormone-sensitive lipase was unaffected. These findings suggest that early postnatal estradiol exposure of female rats result in long-lasting effects on the ovary and parametrial adipose tissue at adult age.

Parametrial adipose tissue

Ovary

Estradiol

Programming

Författare

Camilla Alexanderson

Göteborgs universitet

Elisabet Stener-Victorin

Göteborgs universitet

Joel Kullberg

Akademiska Sjukhuset

Staffan Nilsson

Göteborgs universitet

Chalmers, Matematiska vetenskaper, matematisk statistik

Max Levin

Göteborgs universitet

Stefan Cajander

Lars Lönn

Rigshospitalet

Malin Lönn

Göteborgs universitet

Agneta Holmäng

Göteborgs universitet

The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology

1879-1220 (ISSN)

Vol. 122 82-90

Ämneskategorier

Fysiologi

DOI

10.1016/j.jsbmb.2009.10.006

PubMed

19857573