Inflammatory bowel disease and self-esteem in adolescence.
Reviewartikel, 2008

AIM: To compare the self-esteem of adolescents suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with that of healthy adolescents, and to identify factors affecting self-esteem in the presence of IBD. METHODS: A self-assessment questionnaire, 'I think I am' (ITIA), was completed by 71 (41 boys) out of 77 adolescents (10-16 years) with IBD. Of the participating adolescents, 23 had Crohn's disease, 44 had ulcerative colitis and 4 had indeterminate colitis. The self-esteem of adolescents with IBD was compared with that of 1037 school children. RESULTS: In this population-based study, children with IBD estimated their self-esteem in the same range as healthy adolescents. Using a multiple regression analysis, the self-esteem of adolescents with IBD was related to disease course severity and cohabitation status of parents. Children with severe disease and children of single parents were found to be most at risk of low self-esteem. CONCLUSION: This study shows that, as a group, adolescents with IBD have self-esteem in the same range as their healthy peers, but that there are some adolescents with IBD who are at risk of low self-esteem. Special attention should be given to adolescents with a severe disease course and to those with separated parents.

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Crohn Disease

psychology

Male

Ulcerative

Humans

psychology

Questionnaires

Parents

Regression Analysis

Female

Self Concept

Adolescent

Adolescent Psychology

psychology

Colitis

Marital Status

Child

Författare

Helene Lindfred

Queen Silvia Children's Hospital

Robert Saalman

Queen Silvia Children's Hospital

Staffan Nilsson

Chalmers, Matematiska vetenskaper, matematisk statistik

Göteborgs universitet

Kjell Reichenberg

Göteborgs universitet

Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics

0803-5253 (ISSN) 1651-2227 (eISSN)

Vol. 97 2 201-5

Ämneskategorier

Dermatologi och venereologi

Övrig annan samhällsvetenskap

DOI

10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00605.x

PubMed

18254910