Co-combustion - A summary of technology
Artikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift, 2007

Co-combustion of biomass or waste together with a base fuel in a boiler is a simple and economically suitable way to replace fossil fuels by biomass and to utilise waste. Co-combustion in a high-efficiency power station means utilisation of biomass and waste with a higher thermal efficiency than what otherwise had been possible. Due to transport limitations, the additional fuel will only supply a minor part (less than a few hundreds MWfuel) of the energy in a plant. There are several options: co-combustion with coal in pulverised or fluidised bed boilers, combustion on added grates inserted in pulverised coal boilers, combustors for added fuel coupled in parallel to the steam circuit of a power plant, external gas producers delivering its gas to replace an oil, gas or pulverised fuel burner. Furthermore biomass can be used for reburning in order to reduce NO emissions or for after burning to reduce N2O emissions in fluidised bed boilers. Combination of fuels can give rise to positive or negative synergy effects, of which the best known are the interactions between S, Cl, K, Al, and Si that may give rise to or prevent deposits on tubes or on catalyst surfaces, or that may have an influence on the formation of dioxins. With better knowledge of these effects the positive ones can be utilised and the negative ones can be avoided.

MUNICIPAL SOLID-WASTE

SEWAGE-SLUDGE

COMBUSTION

CHLORINE DEPOSITION

RICH BIOMASS

CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED

GASEOUS EMISSIONS

SULFUR-DIOXIDE

COAL

BOILER

Författare

Bo G Leckner

Chalmers, Energi och miljö

Thermal Science

0354-9836 (ISSN)

Vol. 11 4 5-40

Ämneskategorier

Energiteknik

DOI

10.2298/tsci0704005l