Fabrication of High Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Harvesters for Wireless Sensors
Paper in proceedings, 2013

Implementing energy harvesters and wireless sensors in jet engines could simplify development and decrease costs. A thermoelectric energy harvester could be placed in the cooling channels where the temperature is between 500–900°C. This paper covers the synthesis of suitable materials and the design and fabrication of a thermoelectric module. The material choices and other design variables were done from an analytic model by numerical analysis. The module was optimized for 600–800°C with the materials Ba8Ga16Ge30 and La-doped Yb14MnSb11, both having the highest measured zT value in this region. The design goal was to be able to maintain a temperature gradient of at least 200°C with high power output. The La-doped Yb14MnSb11 was synthesized and its structure confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Measurement of properties of this material was not possible due to insufficient size of the crystals. Ba8Ga16Ge30 was synthesized and resulted in an approximated zT value of 0.83 at 700°C. Calculations based on a module with 17 couples gave a power output of 1100mW/g or 600mW/cm2 with a temperature gradient of 200K.

High temperature energy harvester

Thermoelectric energy harvester

Energy harvester

Author

Elof Köhler

Chalmers, Applied Physics, Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Richard Heijl

Chalmers, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Applied Surface Chemistry

Henrik Staaf

Chalmers, Applied Physics, Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

S. Zenkic

GKN Aerospace

E. Svenman

GKN Aerospace

Anders Palmqvist

Chalmers, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Applied Surface Chemistry

Peter Enoksson

Chalmers, Applied Physics, Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Journal of Physics: Conference Series

17426588 (ISSN) 17426596 (eISSN)

Vol. 476 1 Art. no. 012036-

Driving Forces

Sustainable development

Areas of Advance

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (2010-2017)

Transport

Production

Energy

Materials Science

Subject Categories

Materials Engineering

Aerospace Engineering

Transport Systems and Logistics

DOI

10.1088/1742-6596/476/1/012036

More information

Created

10/8/2017