Carbon-Based Electrode Materials for Microsupercapacitors in Self-Powering Sensor Networks: Present and Future Development
Journal article, 2019

There is an urgent need to fulfill future energy demands for micro and nanoelectronics. This work outlines a number of important design features for carbon-based microsupercapacitors, which enhance both their performance and integration potential and are critical for complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility. Based on these design features, we present CMOS-compatible, graphene-based microsupercapacitors that can be integrated at the back end of the line of the integrated circuit fabrication. Electrode materials and their interfaces play a crucial role for the device characteristics. As such, different carbon-based materials are discussed and the importance of careful design of current collector/electrode interfaces is emphasized. Electrode adhesion is an important factor to improve device performance and uniformity. Additionally, doping of the electrodes can greatly improve the energy density of the devices. As microsupercapacitors are engineered for targeted applications, device scaling is critically important, and we present the first steps toward general scaling trends. Last, we outline a potential future integration scheme for a complete microsystem on a chip, containing sensors, logic, power generation, power management, and power storage. Such a system would be self-powering.

IoT

self-powering systems

sensor networks

energy storage

microsupercapacitors

Author

Anderson David Smith

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Qi Li

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Agin Vyas

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Mohammad Mazharul Haque

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Kejian Wang

Student at Chalmers

Andres Velasco

Student at Chalmers

Xiaoyan Zhang

Chalmers, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Shameel Thurakkal

Chalmers, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Arne Quellmalz

Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)

Frank Niklaus

Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)

Kristinn Gylfason

Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)

Per Lundgren

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Peter Enoksson

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Electronics Material and Systems Laboratory

Sensors

1424-8220 (ISSN) 1424-3210 (eISSN)

Vol. 19 19 4231

Subject Categories

Energy Engineering

Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering

DOI

10.3390/s19194231

PubMed

31569477

More information

Latest update

3/31/2020