Imaging TOF-SIMS of rat kidney prepared by high-pressure freezing.
Artikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift, 2005

Phosphocholine, potassium ions, and sodium ions were localized in rat kidney with imaging TOF-SIMS. Tissue preparation was performed with high-pressure freezing, freeze-fracturing and freeze-drying. The distribution of sodium ions was visualized by imaging the signal at m/z 23 of positively charged secondary ions, and the distribution of potassium ions was visualized by imaging the signal at m/z 39. Potassium was found localized within cells of the proximal tubulus epithelium and within cells of the glomeruli. High signals of sodium ions were seen in the interstitial tissue and also in epithelial cells of the collecting ducts and in glomeruli. The overlay image showed that the distribution of sodium ions and potassium ions were largely complementary with color mixing in glomeruli and in the interstitium surrounding proximal tubules. The ion distribution was further analyzed by correlation analysis. Phosphocholine-containing phospholipids were visualized by imaging the phosphocholine head group at m/z 184 of positively charged ions. The m/z 184 signal shows a ubiquitous distribution with a high intensity of phosphocholine in epithelial cells. Overlay image of m/z 184, m/z 39, and m/z 23 and multivariate analysis showed that the localization of high levels of phosphocholine colocalizes with high levels of potassium ions, as expected for an ion with intracellular localization.

metabolism

Freezing

methods

Mass

Diagnostic Imaging

cytology

Rats

Cytological Techniques

Spectrometry

Image Processing

Computer-Assisted

instrumentation

instrumentation

Secondary Ion

Atmospheric Pressure

Kidney

Animals

methods

methods

Författare

Håkan Nygren

Göteborgs universitet

Katrin Börner

Göteborgs universitet

Per Malmberg

Göteborgs universitet

Elke Tallarek

Birgit Hagenhoff

Microscopy Research and Technique

1059-910X (ISSN)

Vol. 68 6 329-34

Ämneskategorier

MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP

DOI

10.1002/jemt.20258

PubMed

16358283