Vitamin B12 as a potential compliance marker for fish intake
Journal article, 2014

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the following four markers; Vitamin B12, selenium, vitamin D, and parvalbumin may be used as compliance markers for fish intake. Methods: Blood samples from a randomized cross-over herring intervention study (n=32) were analyzed by HPLC and immunochemistry. The criteria were that plasma or serum concentrations of candidate compliance markers after the herring diet should increase significantly compared to starting concentrations. In addition, the reference meat diet should not yield an increase in plasma concentration of the candidate marker. Results: Vitamin B12 and selenium met the set criteria for indicating a correlation between the marker and fish intake with significant increases in serum concentrations at 8.9% (p=0.008) and 4.6% (p=0.02) respectively after a 6-week herring intervention (5 meals a week). Parvalbumin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 levels did not increase significantly during the herring interventions. Conclusions: Vitamin B12 may be suitable as a compliance marker for fish intake. Although selenium also met the criteria, the change in selenium serum concentrations was small compared to the change in vitamin B12 levels.

Compliance

Fish

Biomarker

Marker

Intake

Vitamin B12

Author

Nathalie Scheers

Chalmers, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Life Sciences, Food and Nutrition Science

Helen Lindqvist

University of Gothenburg

Anna-Maria Langkilde

AstraZeneca AB

Ingrid Undeland

Chalmers, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Life Sciences, Food and Nutrition Science

Ann-Sofie Sandberg

Chalmers, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Life Sciences, Food and Nutrition Science

European Journal of Nutrition

1436-6207 (ISSN) 1436-6215 (eISSN)

Vol. 53 6 1327-1333

Subject Categories

Nutrition and Dietetics

DOI

10.1007/s00394-013-0632-5

PubMed

24292746

More information

Latest update

3/21/2018