Spatial heterogeneity in distance decay of using bike sharing: An empirical large-scale analysis in Shanghai
Journal article, 2021

Distance decay is a vital aspect for modeling spatial interactions of human movements and an indispensable input for land use planning and travel demand prediction models. Although many studies have investigated the usage demand of bike-sharing systems in an area, research investigating the distance decay patterns of using dockless bike-sharing systems (DLBS) from a spatially heterogeneous perspective based on large-scale datasets is lacking. This study firstly utilizes massive transaction record data from DLBS in Shanghai of China and online map navigator Application Programming Interface to empirically estimate the distance decay patterns of using DLBS and reveal the spatial heterogeneity in distance decay of using DLBS across different urban contexts. Afterward, this study examines the mechanism of spatial heterogeneity in distance decay, leveraging multiple data resources including Point of Interest (POI) data, demographic data, and road network data. The associations among the distance decay of using DLBS with built environment factors are investigated by multiple linear regression. Results indicate that factors such as population density, land use entropy, branch road density, and metro station density are significantly related to larger distance decay of using DLBS, while factors such as commercial land use ratio, industrial land use ratio, and motorway density are significantly linked to smaller distance decay in Shanghai. Lastly, we further employ an adaptative geographically weighted regression to investigate the spatial divergences of the influences of built environment factors on distance decay. Results reveal notably distinct and even inverse influences of a built environment factor on the distance decay of using DLBS in different urban contexts. The findings provide insights into the distance decay patterns of using DLBS in different urban contexts and their interactions with the built environment, which can support accurate planning and management of sustainable DLBS as per specific urban characteristics.

Distance decay

Shared micro-mobility system

Spatial interactions

Spatial heterogeneity

Built environment

Author

Kun Gao

Chalmers, Architecture and Civil Engineering, GeoEngineering

Ying Yang

Australian Catholic University

Aoyong Li

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETH)

Xiaobo Qu

Chalmers, Architecture and Civil Engineering, GeoEngineering

Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment

1361-9209 (ISSN)

Vol. 94 102814

Subject Categories

Remote Sensing

Landscape Architecture

Human Geography

DOI

10.1016/j.trd.2021.102814

More information

Latest update

4/15/2021