As-HIP Microstructure Of EBM Fabricated Shell Components
Paper in proceedings, 2016

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) was used to build Ti-6Al-4V cylindrical shell samples with different wall thickness filled with powder. Built shell samples were HIPed and the difference in microstructure between the EBM-built walls and densified powder inside the shell components was studied as well as the cohesion between these two regions. Components characterization utilizing LOM and SEM+EBSD indicates that columnar grain growth was consistent before and after HIP in the EBM-built part of the components (walls), whereas the densified material in the center of the component had a fine isotropic microstructure, characteristic for HIPed material. The combination of EBM and HIP is shown to be an attractive way of manufacturing complex-shape full density components for high performance applications, involving shortening of built time in the EBM-processing and lead time in capsule fabrication for HIP.

Additive manufacturing

microstructure of EBM-build components

hot isostatic pressing

EBM of Ti64 shell structures

Author

Alexander Leicht

Chalmers, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Surface and Microstructure Engineering

Maheswaran Vattur Sundaram

Chalmers, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Surface and Microstructure Engineering

Yiming Yao

Chalmers, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Surface and Microstructure Engineering

Eduard Hryha

Chalmers, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Surface and Microstructure Engineering

Lars Nyborg

Chalmers, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Surface and Microstructure Engineering

Lars-Erik Rännar

Mid Sweden University

Andrei Koptioug

Mid Sweden University

Karin Frisk

Swerea KIMAB

MAGNUS AHLFORS

Quintus Technologies AB

World Powder Metallurgy 2016 Congress and Exhibition, World PM 2016; Hamburg; Germany; 9 October 2016 through 13 October 2016

Innovative components manufacturing technology through powder technology (Stage 2)

VINNOVA, 2014-05-15 -- 2016-08-25.

Driving Forces

Sustainable development

Areas of Advance

Production

Materials Science

Subject Categories

Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology

Metallurgy and Metallic Materials

More information

Latest update

11/30/2018