Patrik Fager

Doktorand at Chalmers, Technology Management and Economics, Supply and Operations Management

Patrik Fager is a doctoral student at the Division of Supply and Operations Management and conducts research in the area of sustainable materials handling operations within automotive industry. In specific terms, the work is focused on processes where material arriving from suppliers is configured for use in assembly and production. Examples of such processes are kitting and sequencing. The research aim is to develop knowledge on how these types of processes should be designed from a perspective of both short- and long term sustainability. The target group of the research is primarily logisticians within automotive industry but parts of the result can also be utilised in warehousing and distribution operations in other industries. Patrik is also involved in education in the courses Lean Production and Production Logistics.

Source: chalmers.se

Projects

2014–2017

Utformning av processer för effektiv materialkonfigurering

Lars Medbo Logistics & Transportation
Mats Johansson Supply and Operations Management
Patrik Fager Supply and Operations Management
Robin Hanson Supply and Operations Management
VINNOVA

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Publications

2015

Flexibility of materials preparation processes in production systems

Patrik Fager, Robin Hanson, Mats Johansson
Paper in proceedings
2015

Manufacturing in Sweden: How competitive is Sweden as a manufacturing location?

Patrik Jonsson, Matthias Holweg, Patrik Fager
Report
2015

Providing explicit descriptions of studied systems: more than a necessary evil?

Kristina Liljestrand, Patrik Fager, Christian Finnsgård et al
Paper in proceedings
2014

Quality problems in materials kit preparation

Patrik Fager, Mats Johansson, Lars Medbo
Paper in proceedings
2013

Sustainability and cost efficiency in Supply Chains

Henrik Brynzér, Patrik Fager, Christian Finnsgård et al
Report