Vertically Aligned Graphene Coating is Bactericidal and Prevents the Formation of Bacterial Biofilms
Journal article, 2018

The key first step in developing bacterial infections related to implants and medical devices is the attachment of planktonic bacterial cells, and subsequent formation of biofilms. Herein, it is reported that graphene, a 2D carbon-based material, can be effectively used to prevent bacterial attachment. The key parameter for this effect is the orientation of graphene with respect to the coated surface. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, deposited horizontally on the surface, exhibits no antibacterial effect. By contrast, an array of graphene flakes grown perpendicularly to the surface by a plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD) process prevent biofilm formation. Electron microscopy reveals that the exposed edges of vertically aligned graphene flakes penetrate the bacterial membrane and drain the cytosolic content. Bacteria are not able to develop resistance to this killing mechanism during multiple exposures. By keeping the height of the vertical graphene coating between 60 and 100 nm, the coating is able to effectively kill bacteria, while being completely harmless to mammalian cells.

adhesion

mouse fibroblast cell

biofilm

antibacterial activity

vertical graphene

Author

Santosh Pandit

Chalmers, Biology and Biological Engineering, Systems and Synthetic Biology

Venkata Raghu Mokkapati

Chalmers, Biology and Biological Engineering, Systems and Synthetic Biology

Emanuele Celauro

Chalmers, Biology and Biological Engineering, Chemical Biology

Avgust Yurgens

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Quantum Device Physics

Martin Lovmar

Wellspect Healthcare

Fredrik Westerlund

Chalmers, Biology and Biological Engineering, Chemical Biology

Jie Sun

Chalmers, Microtechnology and Nanoscience (MC2), Quantum Device Physics

Wellspect Healthcare

Beijing University of Technology

Ivan Mijakovic

Chalmers, Biology and Biological Engineering, Systems and Synthetic Biology

Advanced Materials Interfaces

2196-7350 (eISSN)

Vol. 5 7 1701331

Areas of Advance

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (2010-2017)

Subject Categories

Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology

Materials Chemistry

Medical Materials

DOI

10.1002/admi.201701331

More information

Latest update

6/28/2020